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Derrick Story's Recipes for Brightening a Smile and Blotting Out a Blemish

 
By Sara Peyton
November 12, 2008 | Comments: 1
Beauty may be skin deep, but most of us hope to look our best in photos. And the following excerpt from Derrick Story's handy new book, The Photoshop CS4 Companion for Photographers, offers a digital makeover of sorts--recipes for brightening a toothy grin and eliminating a skin blotch or two. "Even though you may not be the photographer to the stars, there will be times when you need to touch up a portrait," notes Derrick, whose new guidebook includes 18 easy-to-follow recipes for perfecting images. But remember, when it comes to digital enhancements Derrick offers this caution, "Regardless of which recipe you're working with at any given moment remember that less is more when retouching portraits." Read on to learn more.

From Chapter 7. Two Photoshop Recipes for Photographers

RECIPE 1: Brightening Teeth

A beautiful smile is both endearing and attractive. Here's how to add a bit of sparkle to any cheerful expression.

  1. Open the image and zoom to 100 percent so that you can get a good look at the teeth.

  2. Go to the Adjustments panel and select Hue/Saturation (it's in the second row). Hold down the Option (Alt) key and drag the white mask thumbnail to the Trash icon at the bottom of the Layers panel.

    psc_0701.png
  3. Click the Targeted Adjustment icon (it appears as a hand with a finger pointing upward) to select it. It turns into an eyedropper when you hover your mouse over the teeth. Pick an area of the tooth surface and then click and drag the dropper to the left. It will desaturate the area you've sampled—in this case, the teeth. Don't worry about the effect of this adjustment on the rest of the image. Focus on the teeth until you like what you see.

    psc_0702.png
  4. Option/Alt-click the Layer Mask icon (at the bottom of the palette). Photoshop will create a black layer mask thumbnail to the right of your Hue/Saturation thumbnail. It will also temporarily hide your adjustment.

  5. Set the foreground color to white in the Tools Panel.

  6. Click the Brush icon in the Tools palette or just press "B" to get the Brush tool. Choose an appropriate brush size and paint the teeth to let the adjustment show through. You may want to use a soft-edged brush for a more natural look. You're literally painting away the yellow coloration.

    Paint on the tooth surface with your brush to reveal the whitening effect.

    psc_0703.png
  7. If you paint outside the lines and need to correct a mistake, switch the foreground color to black (by pressing the X key) for any touch-up work (black hides the adjustment).

  8. Toggle the eyeball icon off and on in the adjustment layer to check your work.

  9. If you find that you were a little overzealous in your dental work, resulting in ultra-bright teeth, you have a couple of options. You can go to the Opacity slider and dial it down until you get a more natural look. Or you can double-click the Hue/Saturation thumbnail and play with the adjustments there.

  10. Save the image as a layered PSD file and place it in the same folder as the original. Open Bridge, select both images, and group them together in a Stack.

TIP: Recipe Variation

This technique is also excellent for brightening the whites of the eyes and removing redness (ruddiness) from skin tones.

RECIPE 2: Touching Up Blemishes

Even on portraits that don't need touch-ups, you may want to remove a blemish or two. Often, this is all you need to do. And the best part is, it's easy!

  1. Create a duplicate of the background layer by choosing in the Layers panel, and pressing ⌘-J (Ctrl-J) or choosing Layer → Duplicate Layer.

  2. Select the Spot Healing brush from the Tools panel.

  3. Select a brush diameter from the Control panel that is a little larger than the blemish you want to remove. You also can use the right and left bracket keys to change the brush diameter on the fly.

  4. Click the blemish once to remove it. If you don't like how Photoshop corrects the imperfection, switch to the Healing brush, and sample an area that you want to use to correct the blemish by Option (Alt)-clicking. In the case of a portrait, look for a skintone similar to the area you are correcting, and set that as your sampling area.

Choose the Spot Healing brush from the Tools panel.

psc_0704.png

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1 Comments

I couldn't make here?

1.

Create a duplicate of the background layer by choosing in the Layers panel, and pressing ⌘-J (Ctrl-J) or choosing Layer → Duplicate Layer.
2.

Select the Spot Healing brush from the Tools panel.
3.

Select a brush diameter from the Control panel that is a little larger than the blemish you want to remove. You also can use the right and left bracket keys to change the brush diameter on the fly.
4.

Click the blemish once to remove it. If you don't like how Photoshop corrects the imperfection, switch to the Healing brush, and sample an area that you want to use sikiş to correct the blemish by Option (Alt)-clicking. In the case of a portrait, look for a skintone similar to the area you are correcting, and set that as your sampling area.

 

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